A Coronavirus Wild Fire Back Up Plan Uses Less Labor And Less Water

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These Fire Fighters are spraying water to knock down the ability for this fire to start up again. Problem with using lots of water on burned out homes during wild fires is its takes a long time and creates radical toxic run offs in our environments. Fires like the one that razed Paradise in November burn thousands of pounds of wiring, plastic pipes and building materials, leaving dangerous chemicals in the air, soil and water. Lead paint, burned asbestos and even melted refrigerators from tens of thousands of households only add to the danger, public health experts say.


A Coronavirus Wild Fire Back Up Plan Uses Less Labor And Less Water

April 29, 2020 by Steve Conboy

Mapping wild land fire areas is a good start, now we need to add the defense, like it's a war in which the enemy is going to attack every year. If it was our military, we would have the defense systems and equipment in place ready to defend and protect before it destroys our communities. We can no longer expect that we can react fast enough with manual labor. We need to learn from what happened in the Woolsey fire, when we did not have enough labor to stop that fire from jumping the 101 freeway to take out Malibu. This charring got way too close to those communities, and it no longer has to happen. Although Cal Fire publishes its own wildland-urban interface map, it does not carry any legal consequences.

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Hundreds of Mighty Fire Breaker small cannons that run on diesel fuel could be deployed to atomized our fire inhibitor so firefighters no longer need to mop up using excessive water while they are destroying our ground water. When they use our atomizing cannons we mist smoldering fires and they can never reignite. The big question is weather the Feds, Cal Fire and the IAFF are ready to embrace new and better applied science now.

Researchers are examining soil tested for the presence of chemical compounds in neighborhoods destroyed by the 2017 wildfire that swept into Santa Rosa, in California’s Sonoma County north of the Bay Area, and comparing it to uninhabited land nearby where only trees had burned, ­Hertz-Picciotto said. In that still-uncompleted study, researchers found nearly 2,000 more chemical compounds in the soil than in uninhabited parkland nearby. Researchers are now working to identify the compounds. While scientists have studied wildfires for decades — learning much about the impact on air, soil and nearby ecosystems — fires that race from the forest into large urban communities were, until recently, exceedingly rare.

“As these types of fires become more frequent in nature, where instead of once every decade it’s once every summer . . . then we really need to know how this is going to affect health,” Bein said

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