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Ex-California Governor Gray Davis predicts the state can turn around wildfire crisis in less than two years.

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Ex-California Governor Gray Davis predicts the state can turn around wildfire crisis in less than two years.

November 3, 2019 by Steve Conboy

M-Fire Is Ready To Show Our Government How To Win Over All Wild Fires now in 2019, because this fire season is not over. We can not wait for two years, the early wild fire elimination solutions are here now in California.

Former California Gov. Gray Davis says the state can turn around its wildfire crisis in the next 18 months, if it does the work that’s needed. Technology should play a major part to help “keep people from the horror of, not only blackouts, but of planned blackouts, presumably to stop more wildfires,” the Democrat says.

Wildfires have been ravaging California for the past week and utilities have been cutting power to prevent downed lines from starting more fires. please read

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Wind Driven Wild Fires Need Chemical Fire Breaks In The Future. If we plan to win over wild fires because adding more young firefighters with hand tools is not cutting it.

Using water during Santa Ana winds dries much too fast for it to be a fire break. M-Fire uses water as the delivery agent, but leaves behind chemistry to shut fire down fast.

Wildfires have plagued California from top to bottom for much of October. Fueled by rushing winds that have pushed flames through brush and dry fields, the fires have collectively charred a piece of land larger than Philadelphia and destroyed hundreds of homes and businesses.

Wildland fires

As many as 90 percent of wildland fires in the United States are caused by people, according to the U.S. Department of Interior. Some human-caused fires result from campfires left unattended, the burning of debris, downed power lines, negligently discarded cigarettes and intentional acts of arson. The remaining 10 percent are started by lightning or lava. According to Verisk’s 2017 Wildfire Risk Analysis 4.5 million U.S. homes were identified at high or extreme risk of wildfire, with more than 2 million in California alone. Wildfires by year

2019: The 2019 wildfire season has not been as active as 2018. However, in late October significant fires broke out throughout California, leading to the evacuation of over 200,000 people and the declaration of a state of emergency.

Kincade Fire in Sonoma County ignited on October 23, and has burned over 76,000 acres—an area more than twice the size of the city of San Francisco. According to CalFire, more than 189 buildings have been destroyed, and 39 more were damaged. Some 90,000 buildings across an expanding evacuation zone are threatened.

The Getty Fire in Los Angeles broke out on October 28. The National Weather Service issued an Extreme Red Flag Warning for the area due to what could be the strongest Santa Ana winds ever seen, with wind gusts up to 80 miles an hour. Over seven thousand residences have been placed in a mandatory evacuation zone.

2018: In 2018 there were 58,083 wildfires, compared with 71,499 wildfires in 2017, according to the NIFC. About 8.8 million acres were burned in 2018, compared with 10 million in 2017.

The Mendocino Complex Fire broke out on July 27 in Northern California and grew to be the largest fire in state history with 459,123 acres burned.

The Carr Fire, which broke out on July 23 in Northern California, is the 8th most destructive fire in the state’s history. Eight fatalities are attributed to the fire, and 1,614 structures were destroyed. Loss estimates are not yet available from the Property Claims Services (PCS) unit of ISO. The Insurance Information Institute estimates that insured losses from the Carr Fire totaled between $1 billion and $1.5 billion in dollars when it occurred.

Insured residential, commercial and auto losses from the Mendocino Complex and Carr Fires topped $845 million, according to the California Department of Insurance (Cal DOI). The two fires collectively resulted in 8,900 homes, 329 businesses, and 800 private autos, commercial vehicles, and other types of property damaged or destroyed. More than 10,000 claims have been filed.

The Camp Fire broke out in Butte County, Northern California on November 8 and became the deadliest and most destructive fire on record in the state. According to Cal Fire statistics 85 people perished. About 153,000 acres were burned and 18,800 structures were destroyed. The fire burned almost 14,000 residences and about 530 commercial structures. The remainder were minor structures. Loss estimates are not yet available from the Property Claims Services (PCS) unit of ISO. The Insurance Information Institute estimates that insured losses from the Camp Fire totaled between $8.5 billion and $10.5 billion in dollars when it occurred.

Further south two other major fires, the Hill and Woolsey Fires started on November 8. The Woolsey Fire burned about 97,000 acres according to Cal Fire. It destroyed about 1,600 structures and killed three people. Loss estimates are not yet available from the Property Claims Services (PCS) unit of ISO. The Insurance Information Institute estimates that insured losses from the Woolsey Fire totaled between $3 billion and $5 billion in dollars when it occurred. The Hill Fire burned about 4,500 acres and destroyed four structures.

Cal DOI said that as of April 2019 insurance claims from the Camp, Hill and Woolsey Fires in November 2018 were already over $12 billion.

2017: In 2017, there were 71,499 wildfires, compared to 65,575 wildfires in the same period in 2016, according to the NIFC. About 10 million acres were burned in the 2017 period, compared with 5.4 million in 2016. The number of acres burned in 2017 was higher than the 10-year average.

Beginning October 6 and continuing until October 25, eight counties in Northern California were hit by a devastating outbreak of wildfires which led to at least 23 fatalities, burned 245,000 acres and destroyed over 8,700 structures.

In December five major fires in Southern California destroyed more than a thousand homes and buildings. One of the fires, the Thomas Fire, became the largest wildfire ever recorded in California up to 2017. In 2018 the Mendocino Complex Fire grew to surpass the acreage burned in the Thomas Fire. Loss estimates are not yet available from the Property Claims Services (PCS) unit of ISO, but it has provided relative rankings for the Atlas, Tubbs and Thomas Fires, placing the blazes as the costliest wildfires in the United States up to 2017. All three are estimated to have caused more than $2.8 billion in insured losses. Cal DOI reported that insurance claims payouts from the October to December fires add up to almost $12 billion, which made the 2017 fire season the costliest on record. Preliminary estimates for 2018 indicate that it most likely will surpass the 2017 record.

Annual Number of Acres Burned in Wildland Fires, 1980-2018

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Annual Number of Acres Burned in Wildland Fires, 1980-2018 * 2004 fires and acres do not include state lands for North Carolina. Source: National Interagency Fire Center.

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